Why I still print Christmas Cards…

Dec 12, 2019

In 2019, as we become increasingly time poor, it’s clear we’re living well into the digital age of convenience. It’s become pretty standard practice over the last decade that in place of the traditional Christmas card, we each post a collective Christmas greeting on our social media page wall, only occasionally taking extra care to inbox a more personalised nicety to a person we care about. That’s the norm now. I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with this method as it of course it has it’s upsides – no paper waste, less time spent remembering addresses & sending out cards that are often lost in post anyway & are subsequently thrown away after the celebrations.

So with those cons in mind, why do I send out Christmas cards each year?

It all started when we purchased our first home in 2009. We had clearly decided to put down roots at this point, we were starting a family, & I wanted to get to know my neighbours. Our home settled over the Christmas/New year period of 2008/2009, & so I decided that dropping a Christmas card into everyone’s letterbox was a great way to introduce ourselves & ‘break the ice’. All my neighbours returned cards, with their names signed off at the bottom, so I now knew who all my neighbours were. Admittedly, we found out that we have brilliant neighbours who have become amazing friends & who continually look out for us & our kids.

Each year since I’ve created a personalised postcard. It’s just a generic design with pictures of my kids & our family. I have many of these pre-designed in my shop available for purchase. The upside of handing out these cards is that my family now have updated photos of us every year. Here we are, living in the most photographed decade ever, & yet we aren’t handing over any photos to our family & friends like we used too.

I do adore the more personalised approach of sending out a card. Of course you have to remember postal addresses, but I believe there’s definitely value in knowing someone’s postal address in these modern days. We may be more ‘connected’ online, but offline we’re shifting addresses & locations frequently & we seldom update our addresses with our friends. Keeping up to date with peoples movements is no longer common-place because the internet has removed location barriers, so taking that little extra initiative to find out where your friends are living is a great step in keeping that connection.

We’re also living busier lives. I can’t speak for everyone, but I’m finding it increasingly harder to check-in on my friends. Day to day life consumes me & before I even notice, 3 or 6 months has passed & I haven’t messaged my friends to see how they’re doing. My yearly cards are a visual reminder that I’m still thinking about them often.

It’s definitely true that I’m the kind of person that get’s excited about receiving post – the non-bill or junk mail kind of post. I know I’m not the only one here. It’s one thing to be hanging on for a parcel you’ve ordered to arrive, but there’s a whole other tangible excitement to receiving something you weren’t expecting. I like to think that when others receive my Christmas cards in the post, they feel that pang of excitement too. And, hey, I’m keeping the postal peeps & the printers in a job aswell!

I once read (& I have no idea where from), that the last words a granddaughter of her grandmother we’re written in a card to her. It made me realise that we are becoming a generation that will have nothing written down for our kids or grand kids. No words of love & inspiration that they can return to, no beautifully scrawled cursive messages that fade with the passage of time. Maybe I’m romanticising it a bit, but I imagine that a handwritten card might be the last keepsake left behind. I can’t help be feel sad that online message turn into white noise & simply can’t capture the thought the way a handwritten message can.

I’m still an avid fan of the old postcard, letter or invitation. For me paper is simply beautiful. Illustration, typography & printing. It’s an art in it’s own right. I value the extra effort & I just love receiving & holding them in my hand. The sentiment for me is so much stronger & more memorable than a rushed facebook post written while your kids are ripping open luxurious gifts, & you’re high on all that Christmas spirit. It feels so much more personal. I like to believe that others feel somewhat the same way as I do & find joy in the Christmas cards they receive from me each year.

It may be too late to order your personalised Christmas cards today, but I have a range of invitations & cards available on my shop year round. I’m working on expanding this range in 2020.

 

 

Why I still print Christmas Cards…

Dec 12, 2019

In 2019, as we become increasingly time poor, it’s clear we’re living well into the digital age of convenience. It’s become pretty standard practice over the last decade that in place of the traditional Christmas card, we each post a collective Christmas greeting on our social media page wall, only occasionally taking extra care to inbox a more personalised nicety to a person we care about. That’s the norm now. I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with this method as it of course it has it’s upsides – no paper waste, less time spent remembering addresses & sending out cards that are often lost in post anyway & are subsequently thrown away after the celebrations.

So with those cons in mind, why do I send out Christmas cards each year?

It all started when we purchased our first home in 2009. We had clearly decided to put down roots at this point, we were starting a family, & I wanted to get to know my neighbours. Our home settled over the Christmas/New year period of 2008/2009, & so I decided that dropping a Christmas card into everyone’s letterbox was a great way to introduce ourselves & ‘break the ice’. All my neighbours returned cards, with their names signed off at the bottom, so I now knew who all my neighbours were. Admittedly, we found out that we have brilliant neighbours who have become amazing friends & who continually look out for us & our kids.

Each year since I’ve created a personalised postcard. It’s just a generic design with pictures of my kids & our family. I have many of these pre-designed in my shop available for purchase. The upside of handing out these cards is that my family now have updated photos of us every year. Here we are, living in the most photographed decade ever, & yet we aren’t handing over any photos to our family & friends like we used too.

I do adore the more personalised approach of sending out a card. Of course you have to remember postal addresses, but I believe there’s definitely value in knowing someone’s postal address in these modern days. We may be more ‘connected’ online, but offline we’re shifting addresses & locations frequently & we seldom update our addresses with our friends. Keeping up to date with peoples movements is no longer common-place because the internet has removed location barriers, so taking that little extra initiative to find out where your friends are living is a great step in keeping that connection.

We’re also living busier lives. I can’t speak for everyone, but I’m finding it increasingly harder to check-in on my friends. Day to day life consumes me & before I even notice, 3 or 6 months has passed & I haven’t messaged my friends to see how they’re doing. My yearly cards are a visual reminder that I’m still thinking about them often.

It’s definitely true that I’m the kind of person that get’s excited about receiving post – the non-bill or junk mail kind of post. I know I’m not the only one here. It’s one thing to be hanging on for a parcel you’ve ordered to arrive, but there’s a whole other tangible excitement to receiving something you weren’t expecting. I like to think that when others receive my Christmas cards in the post, they feel that pang of excitement too. And, hey, I’m keeping the postal peeps & the printers in a job aswell!

I once read (& I have no idea where from), that the last words a granddaughter of her grandmother we’re written in a card to her. It made me realise that we are becoming a generation that will have nothing written down for our kids or grand kids. No words of love & inspiration that they can return to, no beautifully scrawled cursive messages that fade with the passage of time. Maybe I’m romanticising it a bit, but I imagine that a handwritten card might be the last keepsake left behind. I can’t help be feel sad that online message turn into white noise & simply can’t capture the thought the way a handwritten message can.

I’m still an avid fan of the old postcard, letter or invitation. For me paper is simply beautiful. Illustration, typography & printing. It’s an art in it’s own right. I value the extra effort & I just love receiving & holding them in my hand. The sentiment for me is so much stronger & more memorable than a rushed facebook post written while your kids are ripping open luxurious gifts, & you’re high on all that Christmas spirit. It feels so much more personal. I like to believe that others feel somewhat the same way as I do & find joy in the Christmas cards they receive from me each year.

It may be too late to order your personalised Christmas cards today, but I have a range of invitations & cards available on my shop year round. I’m working on expanding this range in 2020.